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20121206
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
there are people like tyson for years. we need to make sure that protection of the environment is part of government. so i like the fact that there is balance there. but let's not lose sight of the fact that this is a big success story. we don't need to have a regulates economy. we need to give the private sector enough breathing room and make sure that we don't brush this initiative. i'm optimistic for the first time in a long time. >> what did you say? free market unregulated economy? >> that is my fantasy. i can't believe it. that we are in agreement on protecting the environment. if the people don't want it, they won't do it. anyway, tyson, thank you. dan mitchell, thank you. now let's talk about california with crashing production and a 13% top state income tax rate. no kidding. no surprise. companies are fleeing the state. but where will they end up? we are about to show you. those little things still get you. for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's ri
gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> breaking news tonight on the libya mess. a new allegation that the obama administration still cannot get its story straight after so much time, even as recently as this morning. ironicall
to extract the region's natural gas, while preserving its environment. i reported from there earlier this year. the banks of the white river in eastern utah are perfectly quiet, in a way it's sometimes hard to find in a world of seven billion people-- just the sounds of gently flowing water, a hint of a breeze, the occasional bird. the gorgeous vistas and rare solitude sit on public land thousands of feet above a bonanza trapped deep in the earth. from high above, it's easy to see how the gas industry has changed the landscape, with gas wells by the thousands altering the fragile desert ecosystem. utah environmentalists say the view from the air and from the canyon floor illustrate why they want these public lands protected. >> you know, what families find when they come here, what outfitters, what americans come to experience this place, it's the quiet, it's the solitude, it's that you don't have the sight and sounds of human development around you. it's a place where people can come and restore themselves. there are more cliffs on this side. and that's an area where there really ar
of taxes going up. how much power does grover norquist wheel in this environment? >> he wheeled power. the invincibility of grover norquist is overblown by us in the media. this tax pledge isn't with grover norquist as it is with taxpayers in the state that whoeted for the conservatives who signed the pledge. i think it's foolish to think there isn't going to be a deal cut. we don't know what the deal will be. it's fool toish think thish to drove us off the fiscal cliff. we're in the political dance now. we've seen this time and time again. there is still three weeks for a deal to be cut. the problem is that the white house threw down a heavy marker yesterday. we'll have to see if they're willing to compromise. it's got to be compromised on both sides. >> that's right. the marker they threw down, kevin, is it the white house says actual tax rates, the top tax rate, 35%, has to go up for the rich. and that limiting deductions won't be enough to get a deal. now you wrote in the atlantic this week that despite that there is a way around this for republicans who don't want to incur the wr
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
feel good, or do you gain ground in a competitive environment against china? >> we absolutely gain ground. i want to see, we have real strengths in america. with strengths in the things all the other countries die for. hire education, entrepreneurial climate, a lot of science and technology, enormous dynamism in this country and a lot of strengths. but what we've done is we allowed a bunch of unnecessary costs of doing business to grow up and creep up. by in action basically. at the same time as all these other countries, and, of course, i work around the world on this topic, all the other countries have whole task forces of national leaders that work every day to drive down the cost of doing business and make the infrastructure better and make better airports and make better data communications, and make it simpler to do business. so what's happened is we've taken for granted, we have these great strengths can look at us, we're wonderful. we've not been able to make progress. we're not talking about hard stuff. talking about keeping our infrastructure modern. we are talking about
welcoming environment for women in the military. gay men are benefiting more from it than lesbians who want to be in direct round combat. >> we are going to stay right here and add a couple more voices into the conversation. this struggle for women in the military goes all the way back to the continental army. just who was robert shirless. i'll tell you when we come back. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. >>> one of the first american women known to serve as a soldier did so as a man. debra sampson of mas
kids having fun. nevertheless, even in this environment, he doesn't go anywhere without an armed guard. although here, the rifle is left in its case. >> it's hard to have a normal life. it's extremely difficult. i love playing tennis. i haven't played in a couple years. i love going to the movies. i haven't gone to the movies in a couple years. >> reporter: he's a family man, a lawyer by trade. the mayor could quit tomorrow and live a less stressful, financially lucrative life. as we travel in his armored vehicle, he says he's well aware a killer could target him at any time so i asked him about quitting. do you have any thoughts about that possibility? >> no. i won't step down of my position. it's a very important position. what we're doing is extremely important for our city. if we don't do it today, it's going to be very hard to do it tomorrow. it's going to be double hard. >> reporter: the contrasts in his life are surreal. the law-abiding citizens want him to succeed. the cartels want him punished. they want him dead. gary tuchman, cnn, juarez, mexico. >> jose reyes finished his t
environment. we have different politics in some sense. and yet divided government all the same. so there's some similarities and differences and we're going to hear from some wonderful people to talk about that. i'll go in order on my immediate right, ron elving, a george mason adjunct faculty member. his day job is senior washington editor of npr for a number of years. he's on "talk of the nation" among other things an under his direction npr has received numerous awards. he was also the political editor of "usa today" and has written bobbings on the congress. next to him, jackie colmes, a journalist with "the new york times," hopefully she'll be reporting on this event. hopefully. wishful thinking. she's been a longtime reporter not only with "the new york times" but "the wall street journal" on budget and economic matters and tax policy covering the white house and congress. worked for "c.q." herself early on. and next to her, joe min-yard who has been at the scene, behind the days at a number of the -- dice at -- deist at a number of these -- dais at a number of these events. he was
, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... those little things for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not
of not -- of not only not facing re-election, having to deal with this in the re-election campaign environment, but having just come off a serious electoral college win. >> yeah. and i think -- i mean, it's kind of remarkable the change in tone. and it's not -- it's not the kind of abject capitulation that one might expect. or one might think might be warranted by what the voter said at the polls. but it is a modulation in tone that has been completely absent during the entirety of the first four years. there was almost nothing like this, even from day one when the president was sworn in, the first time around. we are seeing at least a little bit of an acknowledgment that they are on the wrong side of the majority of the american public on these key issues. >> joy, the -- my sense of what's going on here is that you're really seeing shadow boxing. that boehner knows, there is nothing i can do. we're going to have to go off the curb for my members to understand where we really are. we're going to have to have one week of the united states of america operating under higher tax brackets, higher w
opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galaxy s3. secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. >>> i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get
communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snapshot from progressive. test-drive snapshot before you switch. visit progressive.com today. anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. >>> back now with my special guests, grover norquist and robert reish. you've had a couple minutes to think about
protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicar
that is on c-span 2. on c-span 3, the senate environment and public works committee will hear about the impact of hurricane sandy. coming up, former congressional leaders talk about what congress learn from the 1990 agreement. from the bipartisan policy center, this is under two hours. >> ok. welcome. i am the director of public administration program. i want to welcome you to the session, which we are calling looking back to move a forward. this is co-sponsored by george mason university and the bipartisan policy center. it is our pleasure to put this on and to recognize with all the frenzy about the fiscal cliff that we have a history. some of the history is successful in resolving deep seated hard choices. that is will we will look back and talk about today and see whether we can learn any lessons from the experience. we will go over the detailed program in a few minutes. i want to introduce our keynote speaker tom davis. he has covered many basis. he was the county executive of fairfax county. he was the representative to congress and became a chair and it did many important hearings and r
americans who saved it do not have enough for environment. lori: should average investors follow the institutions? >> yeah, you know, one of the things we are seeing is a lot of institutions have held off or have looked at managing risk and mitigating in their own portfolios. you are looking at this longer-term investing. writing to the store. looking at structures that allow you to mitigate risk and have better sleeping at night. you cannot fund a retirement by earning a half of a percent of 1% and a stable money market fund or bond. you will need to take some risk. sure. i was just going to come in with a risk. should i go risk on all the way and really go crazy and put in some, you know -- [talking over each other] >> it all depends on what your circumstances are. if you have some longer-term horizons, you should be looking out what type of risk you can look at in the portfolio. the big dynamic change has been risks moving from i do not want to miss the upside to a game i want to watch and protect my principal. it is about risk budgeting now more than the way i need to allocat
begin with feeding america, maggie? because america's food environment has so many -- is laden with problems. >> one in five children in 50 million food impoverished americans, 1 in 5 are children. i think this news really struck howard buffett by surprise in his own hometown of decatur. i think two-thirds of the high school students are taking free lunches. and that, he said, was in a town where food processing is its home. >> exactly. >> and he basically decided, this is a problem we can fix. as he says in the piece, he wants to put hunger in america out of business, which does sound a lot like his dad. >> hard to do because you have to also look at the food and how it's made and the processing is such a part of the problem because you can have a hungry child who's also obese. and it doesn't make sense, but when you look at the way food is prepared and what is fed to these children when they can eat, it's not a good option for them. >> it's not, but you know, howard says, too, that there's no shortage of food, good produce food, in america that farmers either don't farm or ha
] >> grover! >> stephanie: norquist and maria commented this is a different environment than the 1990s. grover said we got four years of bad regulation, higher taxes. he wants to add more taxes to the tea party too. it will starve tea party i if obama pushes us over the cliff. [ screaming ] >> can't just wait for tea party three. >> probably about 150 billion. >> stephanie: that would be bad. okay. oh, let's see. phillip in durham disagrees with everything i say. about everything? >> ever! >> stephanie: hi, phillip. >> caller: hi, stephanie. look. appreciate the show. i think you have not been fair to the facts and let me just ask you from the -- what we're talking about -- >> stephanie: the facts are oversensitive in my opinion. >> caller: that's why you're better as a comedian than a political pundit. >> stephanie: all right. >> caller: the fact of the matter is simply this. timothy geithner proposed a budget plan that was already presented to the senate and was voted down 99-0. have you told your listeners t
always on the eye of creating an environment where businesses can grow and provide great jobs and great careers going forward. i think that's the most important thing is to stay focused on what the job is at hand. >> and anything about the cup holders? >> well, you can have big cups or small cups. >> what else do you have in the car, though? internal, people like gadgets now. do they have the maps and everything like that? >> we have my lincoln touch system which is really the latest and greatest in human machine interfaces, it's really nice. you can command the vehicle with your voice. and you can do it with the swipe of your finger, of course. but probably the neat thing we have is a new push button transmission. and instead of your traditional shifter -- >> it if you're chrysler -- >> push, drive or reverse. what's neat about it, it freed up the instrument panel, the center console to be really beautiful now. because we don't have that big, clunky, shift mechanism. i think you'll find some new things. >> does it have a great democratic name? postmaster general from the '30s and '40s?
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)